Looking west from Rampart Mountain over the Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond, located north of the Berkeley Pit, in 2007. North of the Berkeley Pit stands one of the largest earthen dams in the United States. The dam, constructed from waste rock mined out of the Berkeley Pit and, in more recent years, the Continental Pit, stands over 650 feet (200 […]

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What is ‘Superfund’?

Butte has the dubious distinction of being at the upper end of the largest complex of federal Superfund sites in the U.S. This Superfund complex extends from Butte and Anaconda 120 miles down the Clark Fork River to Missoula. The word “Superfund” is tossed around a lot by local and state officials working in the Clark Fork Basin, but, to […]

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West Camp also part of mine flooding site

The anatomy of the thousands of miles of tunnels beneath the Butte Hill is daunting to consider and little understood by many. Important details, such as the distinction between the “West Camp” and “East Camp”, can cause consternation for many a curious observer. The Berkeley Pit and surrounding underground mine workings and bedrock wells are referred to as the “East […]

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Looking northeast from the Berkeley Pit viewing stand, visitors can see one of the most important components in the future management of the Pit: the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant. Sitting on four acres near the former McQueen neighborhood, about 600 feet east of the Berkeley Pit, the treatment plant was constructed in 2002-2003. It sits on native land that […]

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The Berkeley Pit is literally world famous in the mine waste cleanup industry, and the final technology used in the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant, a High Density Solids (HDS) process, was selected after an assessment of tests and the demonstrated effectiveness of cleanup technologies from research groups around the world. The Horseshoe Bend facility currently treats water from Horseshoe […]

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