Looking west from Rampart Mountain over the Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond, located north of the Berkeley Pit, in 2007.

Looking west from Rampart Mountain over the Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond, located north of the Berkeley Pit, in 2007.

North of the Berkeley Pit stands one of the largest earthen dams in the United States. The dam, constructed from waste rock mined out of the Berkeley Pit and, in more recent years, the Continental Pit, stands over 650 feet (200 meters) tall. It holds back the Yankee Doodle tailings impoundment, also known as the Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond. As part of active mining operations, Montana Resources pumps tailings and water to the Yankee Doodle Pond. Lime rock is also added, resulting in a non-acidic pH (above 7.0) tailings slurry, thus mitigating or avoiding the phenomenon of acid mine drainage.

The Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond, part of the active Montana Resources mine that borders the Berkeley Pit, in 2008. Photo by Justin Ringsak.

The Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond, part of the active Montana Resources mine that borders the Berkeley Pit, in 2008.

Tailings particles settle out on the south portion of the ponds. Snowmelt runoff from upper drainages also mixes with the water at the north end of the pond. These factors result in clear water with an alkaline (or non-acidic) pH and very low concentrations of dissolved metals at the north end of the pond.

When mining operations were suspended from 2000 through 2003, water was no longer pumped to the Yankee Doodle site, and the tailings deposited there began to dry out. In response to concerns from the community over dust clouds blowing in the vicinity of the tailings pond, Montana Resources spread about 1.5 million tons of rock, approximately 18 inches deep, over about 506 aces at the tailings impoundment site to keep the dust down. Since the mine reopened, the tailings deposit has remained wet, resulting in no further instances of tailings-dust clouds on Butte’s northern horizon.

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