PitWatch reader Coleen Christensen pointed out this blog from the Smithsonian about a possible use for acid mine drainage stream waters. Streams near the Berkeley Pit were similarly impacted during historic mining activities. Read the full blog here.

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Berkeley Pit slough

On February 8, 2013 material from the southeast wall of the Berkeley Pit collapsed into the Pit water in what is known as a rotational slump or slough. Such sloughs are relatively common in open pit mines. For example, a similar slough occurred at the Berkeley Pit in 1998. The recent slough was about 550 feet wide and caused an […]

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Do Butte residents need flood insurance?

No. Butte residents don’t need to worry about flood insurance in regard to the Berkeley Pit and connected underground mine workings. The Berkeley Pit and connected tunnels act as a sink that collects groundwater in the area. Water levels in the Berkeley Pit and associated mine shafts are currently 175 to 200 feet below the rim of the Pit. The […]

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Water from the Horseshoe Bend drainage is diverted before reaching the Pit and treated in the Horseshoe Bend Water Treatment Plant for use in mining operations. In 2012, the plant treated about 5 million gallons of water per day. Sludge from the treatment process was returned to the Pit at a rate of 491,000 gallons per day. No water or […]

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How is the Pit monitored?

The Montana Bureau of Mines & Geology (MBMG) measures the water levels at the Pit and in connected mine shafts and wells each month. To monitor water quality, water samples are collected from the Pit semi-annually at multiple depths as safe access allows. 23 wells and 14 mine shafts supply information about the deep bedrock aquifer. 36 wells provide similar […]

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