1955-1982: Berkeley Pit history

Over the active lifespan of the Berkeley, approximately 320 million tons of ore and over 700 million tons of waste rock were mined from the Pit. Put another way, “The Richest Hill on Earth” produced enough copper to pave a four-lane highway four inches thick from Butte to Salt Lake City and 30 miles beyond. In 1955, mining in Butte […]

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West Camp also part of mine flooding site

The anatomy of the thousands of miles of tunnels beneath the Butte Hill is daunting to consider and little understood by many. Important details, such as the distinction between the “West Camp” and “East Camp”, can cause consternation for many a curious observer. The Berkeley Pit and surrounding underground mine workings and bedrock wells are referred to as the “East […]

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The Past Butte’s Memory Book tells the story of Jim Ledford, a miner who lived in a log cabin below the famed Anaconda Mine. Alongside his cabin was an old dump containing scrap iron and tin cans. Mine water ran downhill through the dump, and Ledford noticed a heavy sludge formation. Out of curiosity, he had the sludge assayed and […]

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Who is responsible for treating the water?

The Atlantic Richfield Co., a subsidiary of British Petroleum (ARCO or BP-ARCO) which bought out the Anaconda Co. in 1977, and Montana Resources (MR), the company now mining in the Continental Pit adjacent to the east of the Berkeley, are responsible, along with four other entities affiliated with MR: Asarco, Inc.; AR Montana Corp.; MR Inc., and Dennis Washington. If […]

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