In past years, many visitors were curious about the waterfall visible from the Pit Viewing Stand. Montana Resources pumped water out of the Berkeley Pit, then removed the copper from that water before returning it to the Pit (click here for more information on mining copper from Pit water). The waterfall was created by this returning water. However, this activity […]

Read More...

1982-2013: 31 years since pumps stopped

Over 31 years ago economic factors led the Atlantic-Richfield Corporation, or ARCO, now a subsidiary of British Petroleum, to cease mining operations at the Berkeley Pit in Butte, Montana. Underground mining had come to an end seven years earlier, but the underground pumps had continued to operate, pumping groundwater out from the mines and the Berkeley Pit. The 1982 suspension […]

Read More...

The plant treats about 3.4 million gallons of water per day. This water currently comes from the Horseshoe Bend drainage. Treated water is used in Montana Resources mining operations. Sludge from the treatment process is returned to the Pit at a rate of 250,000 gallons per day. No water or waste leaves the Berkeley Pit or mine site.

Read More...

North of the Berkeley Pit stands one of the largest earthen dams in the United States. The dam, constructed from waste rock mined out of the Berkeley Pit and, in more recent years, the Continental Pit, stands over 650 feet (200 meters) tall. It holds back the Yankee Doodle tailings impoundment, also known as the Yankee Doodle Tailings Pond. As […]

Read More...

West Camp also part of mine flooding site

The anatomy of the thousands of miles of tunnels beneath the Butte Hill is daunting to consider and little understood by many. Important details, such as the distinction between the “West Camp” and “East Camp”, can cause consternation for many a curious observer. The Berkeley Pit and surrounding underground mine workings and bedrock wells are referred to as the “East […]

Read More...