Since the Berkeley Pit was designated as a Superfund site in the 1980s, things have gone largely as expected. In one instance the site remedy has proceeded at a faster pace than mandated in the 1994 Record of Decision (or ROD, available in its entirety here). The ROD called for the water treatment plant for the Pit to be designed […]

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Drones in the works for water quality sampling

Montana Resources and Atlantic Richfield are currently funding a Montana Tech graduate student to develop a remote system to sample Pit water quality. The student will review options to collect the required data, including aerial or water-based drones that can be operated from the shore of the Pit. Due to the size of the Pit and the need to collect […]

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A 5.6 magnitude earthquake centered near Dillon on July 25, 2005 did not affect the Berkeley Pit. There was no Pit wall sloughing or change in the water levels in the Berkeley Pit, the underground mine shafts, the alluvial aquifer wells, or the majority of the bedrock monitoring wells. However, two bedrock monitoring wells (A&B) showed changes. Well A showed […]

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Since the last issue of PITWATCH, Montana Resources has decided to resume operations. With the mine going again and with the water treatment plant coming on line, there have been many questions from the community. Here are some answers to reader questions. Q: How much total water went into the Berkeley Pit since the suspension of mining at Montana Resources? […]

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Pit Facts

PitWatch Issue Volume 4, Number 2 Pit Facts Comparison Compare Pit elevations to those of… the Belmont Senior Center at 5,605 feet above sea level; East Middle School at 5,517 feet; the Butte Airport at 5,525 feet; the County Courthouse at 5,755 feet. Compare the depth of Pit water to the height of… the Anaconda smelter stack at 585 feet; […]

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